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Evaluation

Hypospadias is usually diagnosed in the newborn nursery by the characteristic appearance of the penis. The urinary opening (“meatus”) is lower than normal, and most boys have only partial development of the foreskin, lacking the normal covering for the glans on the underside. The abnormal “hooded” foreskin calls attention to the condition. However, not all newborns with partial foreskin development have hypospadias, as some have a normal urinary opening with a hooded foreskin, which is called “chordee without hypospadias”.

Megameatus with intact prepuce (MIP) variant of hypospadias occur when the foreskin is normal and there is a concealed hypospadias. The condition is discovered during newborn circumcision or later in childhood when the foreskin begins to retract. A newborn with normal-appearing foreskin and a straight penis who is discovered to have hypospadias after a circumcision was started can have circumcision completed without worry for jeopardizing future hypospadias repair. Hypospadias discovered after a circumcision is almost never a result of injury during the circumcision.

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